2016-09

2016-07

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2016 Cumulative Update #1 for SQL Server 2016 RTM.

2016-06

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #7 for SQL Server 2014 SP1.

2016-02

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #5 for SQL Server 2014 SP1.

2015-12

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #4 for SQL Server 2014 SP1.

2015-11

2015-10

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #3 for SQL Server 2014 SP1.

2015-08

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #2 for SQL Server 2014 SP1.

2015-04

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #7.

2015-03

Data Loading performance considerations with Clustered Columnstore indexes. In it they talk of loading data into partitioned tables where the load is aligned. Interestingly, their recommended process is to load into a staging table with the clustered columnstore index created first.

This is still based on the fact that you can hit the magic number of 1,048,576, or at the very least 102,400, per bulk insert, to create compressed segments. If you cannot, then I still feel that the method of loading into a heap, and then creating the clustered columnstore index, is preferential. This is because if you trickle insert into a CCI, you will end up with a mixture of open/closed delta stores and come compressed segments. You could leave it to the tuple mover to compress these, and you would still be left with some open delta stores. However, as Remus Rusanu points out, this is not recommended. To complete the process quickly, and to remove any open delta stores, you would need to rebuild the partition.

2015-02

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #6.

2015-01

Spaghetti DBA. The authors main complaint was that he had grown disillusioned with Connect and the way in which so many issues are dealt with (ie, closed as “Won’t” Fix”). All the author wanted was better feedback from the engineers when responding to issues. I’m adding my voice to this request because in the past year I have raised a couple of issues myself, only to be disappointed with the feedback:

2014-11

properties to this list to expand the info that you want. I’ve often mused about moving a lot of the logic that I constantly put in these scripts into higher tier functions in Powershell, or even create a ssas library, but time is always a premium…

2014-10

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #4.

2014-09

Incremental Service Modelling, Microsoft have released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #3.

2014-08

SQL Server 2014 Clustered Columnstore Indexes and Partitioning. The script below will create the database and the objects necessary. I’m going to state the obvious, but read through the scripts first before you run them; things like file locations on boxes are always different:

2014-06

Incremental Service Modelling, no sooner have they released SQL 2014 RTM, Microsoft have now released SQL Server 2014 Cumulative Update #2.

Connect article already open.

2014-05

here has the full details)

One of the features of SQL 2014 which got less column inches (pun intended) than Hekaton/ in memory OLTP but was of more interest to me was the clustered columnstore indexes, or CCI for brevity.

2014-04

2014-03

2014-02

2013-10

to download here. It is also available as a VM on Azure. According to a tweet from Glenn Berry, the version number in the demo is 12.0.1524.

Before what you download and install, here’s what you ought to know;

2013-07

2013-06

Visual Studio 2013 Preview and now the SQL Server 2014 CTP1. And that’s just the ones I’m focusing on! There’s the Windows 8.1 Preview as well as Windows Server 2012 R2. What with all the keynotes from Build and both TechEd’s this month, it is clear that Microsoft have certainly accelerated the release cycle and embraced a cloud-first development model. For me this is most noticeable in Team Foundation Services, the Azure based Source Control solution. Features were turned on regularly before they were released in the three updates we’ve had since the release of TFS 2012 back in August. This is a big change from the Microsoft’s previous strategy of developing for its products hosted on the premises first and then being pushed to them to the cloud afterwards.

At a later date I’ll dig more into features of SQL 2014, as this week my focus has been on Visual Studio 2013, which is out sometime this year, as well as doing my job in real life. The duties of blogging…